Artwork by Andrea Michael



To look up a faery by its name, click on the first letter of that name.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P R S T W V



Ankou (aka Death, the Grim Reaper, Father Time) – Though many cultures have a personified version of death as part of their folklore there is nothing to suggest that any of these beings were ever worshipped as Death Gods. However, Ankou, like a deity, is a part of all five of the elements. In Brittany, Cornwall, Wales and Ireland he is the personification of death whose job it is to gather the souls of newly dead humans. He is described as being a dark and ominous male clothed in a black hooded cape. No one alive has ever seen his face; to do so would be to die. Ankou has no interest in humans or the lives of the living; he just does his job.

Ankou originated in the Celtic lore of Brittany in Northern France, where he has been all but forgotten, and from there he went to Ireland. He is now a deep part of Irish mythology. In Ireland’s County Roscommon, there is a documented case of a mother and daughter who heard Ankou driving his horse drawn cart past their cottage each night around midnight accompanied by the beautiful music of the fae. Though they could hear the sounds of horsed hooves, the rattle of the carriage’s wheels, and the faery’s music, they could never see a thing.

In no other land does Ankou have more of a personality than in Ireland where he is always considered to be a faery, as opposed to any other type of spirit or ghost.

Contacting Ankou is not advisable, but if you should happen to see him out and about, don’t be afraid, just stand at a respectable distance and observe him; it will help you to gain a better understanding of death.

Old Irish Proverb: “when Ankou comes, he will not go away empty.”

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Devas (aka Deev, Dev, Devi) – Devas are a part of many cultures and they are believed to have originated in the ancient religion of Persia, Zoroastrianism. Deva, in Sanskrit, means "Shining One."

To the Hindus and Buddhists they are usually said to be kind and helpful spirits, heroes, or goblins of divine or semi-divine origin. Hinduism recognizes three types of devas: mortals living on a higher realm than other mortals, enlightened people who have realized God, and Brahman in the form of a personal God. In Buddhism, devas are gods who live in the various realms of heaven as reward for their previous good deeds, but they are still subject ot rebirth.

It is Madame Helena P. Blavatsky, co-founder of the Theosophical Society, who first introduced us to the current idea of Devas. In her opinion they are angels or gods that were promoted from their existences in previous planetary periods. She believes that they existed before both elementals and human beings, and that they exist in a state of dormancy until mankind is ready to recieve their wisdom. Only then will they wake up and join with the elementals to aid in the development of mankind's spirituality.

Today Devas are considered to be nature spirits who are only visible to those with clairvoyant abilities, their sole means of communication being through clairaudience and meditation. As architects of nature, they are believed to be cooperating with those humans who are working to understand and protect nature, as was recently discovered in the produce of Findhorn in Scotland and Perelandra in Washington, D.C. It is also believed that every living thing has its own deva tending to it, even the soil, controlling all of the energies necessary for health and growth. The afformentioned facilities credit Devas with giving them information on how to properly take care of their plants.

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Deevs are small faeries considered to be malignant demons, in Persian mythology and folklore, that are constantly at war with Peris, whom they imprison at the very tops of trees in hanging iron cages. These evil spirits detest all things of any beauty.

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Devs are the demon servants of the supreme evil in the Zoroastrian religion of Iran, Ahriman. These malevolent genii are constantly fighting against the good works of the Asuras, Amshaspands, and Izeds. Ahrimon is said to have 28 of these minions, 6 of whom are the Arch-Devs Arzshenk, Demrush, Hondkonz, Munheras, and two others who are led by hares or Iblis. They are depicted as beings of deformed human shape with long shaggy hair, horns, bulging eyes, long fangs, and the paws and tail of an animal. Repelled by the stench of sweet fragrances, they are said to eat corpses and torture the souls of the damned.

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Divs are powerful malignant spirits of Armenia who look like men and women and shape shift into cyclopean wild animals with as many as seven heads. They live in caves and forests, and you know that they are around if a person faints, feels itchy, or sneezes. You can protect yourself from them by slicing the air with a knife.

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Father Time (aka Old Father Time) – This European spirit of time has long white hair and a beard and carries a scythe in his right had and an hour glass in his left. He wears a monk’s habit, and is sometimes described as having wings. Every year, at the stroke of midnight on New Year’s Eve, Father Time is re-born as the Baby New Year who develops into Father Time as the year progresses.

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Jimaninos y (and) Jimananas (heem-awn-neen-yoo/yas) – These Mexican and Central American faeries may have originated with the Aztecs or people of Spain. They appear as troops of pudgy children with wings. They tend to avoid humans, except during El Dia de Muerte, the Day of the Dead, a Mexican festival held each year on November 2nd, when they join the people in celebration by dancing in the streets and visiting cemeteries. On this day they are known to play pranks, and some say they are the souls of children who don’t know that they’ve died.

The best time to contact them, obviously, is on the evening of November 2nd, but they may also be willing to come out and help with Samhain rituals honoring your ancestors. If you sense that the spirits that are present truly are those of discarnate children you, as a pagan, are in a position to help them cross over to the land of the dead.

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Nymphs – Nymphs exist in every possible place in nature, are known in many different cultures throughout the world, and are all over Faeryland. Nymph is a classification of small lovably seductive female fae folk. There are tree nymphs, water nymphs, grove nymphs, etc. who all live in harmony with nature, the Greek deities and mythical creatures such as Pegasus and the Satyrs. They are described and pictured as beautiful young women clothed in sheer flowing gowns, with lovely hair arranged in the classical Greek style, and golden bands around their heads. They are known for their playfulness and excessive sexuality, and as attendants of the gods, they provided music, dancing, and theatrics for entertainment, and were also employed as seers and teachers of the gods’ children. They are the guardians of the places they live in and those creatures that share their home.

To contact a nymph call to the one that inhabits the place you’ve chosen to perform your magick in. Though they are usually too playful to be useful working partners, they will usually invite you to play with them, and you should feel free to do so. They genuinely like kind and loving humans, though they can be malevolent towards those who have evil intentions. If you are a human male, having sexual relations with them is a very powerful way to direct energy out towards a specific goal.

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The roles of nymphs in other cultures is the same as in Greek mythology, though they are known by different names, as follows:

Anitsutsa – The Cherokee Native American name for the Pleiades of Greek mythology.

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Moss Maidens – see Moss People under Air Faeries. Wood WivesEarth Faeries. Dirne-weible, Elle folk, Elle King, Ellen, Spae- Wives (elves) – all can be found listed under Earth Faeries.

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Apsaras – See Water Faeries.

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Atlantides – The eight daughters of Atlas and Pleione of Greek mythology, sisters of the Hyads, who have become known as the Taurean constellation Pleiades.

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Carmenae – Prophetic nymphs of Roman mythology named for their leader, Carmenta (aka Carmentis). There was a time when their prophecies were so highly revered and sought after that there was an altar dedicated to Carmenta and the Porta Carmentalis in Rome is named in her honor as well.

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Gandharvas – See Earth Faeries, Gandharvas.

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Hesperides – The group of Greek nymphs born of Atlas and Hesperus; known in other traditions as the daughters of Nyx and Erebus or of Ceto and Phorcys. Their number also varies from seven to the more common three, Aegle, Erytheia, and Hesperesthusa or Erythesis, Hestia, and Arethusa. These sisters are the guardians of the queen of the god’s golden apple grove, which Hercules earned an apple from by completing one of his legendary labors.

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Houri – In the Muslim tradition of Persia these are beautiful, pure, and shapely female spirits who live in Paradise. Also known as Hur and Huri (Huran is plural), they dance and play music while they await the arrival of the faithful to whom they will pleasure, as promised, in the afterlife.

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Hyades – The seven nymphs of Greece and Rome whose name means “Rainy,” they too were fathered by Atlas. Because of their inconsolable grief at the death of their brother Hyas, they were changed into the constellation that bears their name. The names of the Hyades are: Cleia, Eudore, Coronis, Phaeo, Phaesyle, Ambrosia, Dione, Nysa and/or Thyene.

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Kollimalaikanniyarka – See Earth Faeries, Kollimalaikanniyarka.

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Limenia – the Greek and Roman group of nymph guardians of harbors.

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Limnae (a.k.a. Limnead) – The collective name for the Greek and Roman guardian nymphs of marshes.

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Limoneads – The group of Greek and Roman nymphs who are the guardian spirits of meadows and their wild flowers.

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Meliae – The group of Greek nymphs of the ash tree, whose name Meliai, they share. They were born of the blood of Uranus' castration and are the Roman nymphs who fed Jupiter ash tree sap while he was a baby. This particular sap is called meli, "honey," and the trees that produce it are called Fraxinus ornus, Manna-ash. They fed him honey, also known as the manna, the food of the gods. The most notable of Meiliae nymphs is Melia.

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Melia - a Meliae nymph who grew from the spilled blood of Uranus' castration. She and her brother were the parents of Io, Phoroneus, Aegialeus (or Phegeus). She is also said to be the mother of Amycus by Poseidon.

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Melissa – The name given to the Greek and Roman nymph who, in the form of a bee, is the guardian spirit of nature and nurturing. She is the daughter of King Melissues and is said to have fed Zues goat's milk and taught humans how to use honey. Hers is also a name for the priestesses of Demeter and Artemis.

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Muses – The eleven nymphs who are the guardian spirits of the arts in Greek and Roman mythology. Although they are usually kind and helpful, they have been known o become vengeful when offended. They are the daughters of Zues, the king of the gods, and Mnemosyne, the nymph of memory. Each spirit is the patron of one aspect of the arts who sing, dance, recite poetry, and otherwise perform to entertain the gods in Olympus. They were also known for holding contests, which they almost never lost, and maliciously punishing the losers for their audacity. The riddle of the sphinx, which Oedipus solved, was created by the Muses.

Their names and areas of guardianship are as follows:
Aoene – singing.
Melete – meditation.
Mneme – memory.
Calliope (a.k.a. Kalliope) – epic poetry.
Clio – history.
Erato – love poetry.
Melpomene – tragedy.
Polyhymnia – eloquence.
Terpsichore – tragedy.
Thalia – comedy.
Urania – astronomy.

The Muses are known in other places as Aganippides, Aonides, Castalides, Corycides, Heliconiades, Libethrides, Olympiades, Parnassides, and Pierides.

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Naiades – See Water Faeries, Naiaides.

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Napaeae – See Earth Faeries, Napaeae.

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Naphae – The Greek and Roman guardian nymphs who inhabit glens and small valleys.

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Nereids – See Water Faeries, Nereids.

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Oceanids – See Water Faeries, Nereids.

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Oread – See Earth Faeries, Oread.

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Pleiades – The eight daughters of Pleione and Atlas in Greek and Roman mythology, the sisters of the Hyades, who were constantly being pursued by Orion. Tiring of the chase, they begged the gods to help them, whereupon they were turned into pigeons before being transformed into the stars of the constellation Pleiades. Their names are Alcyone, Asteropea, Celoeno, Electra, Maia, Merope, Sterope, and Taygate.

Alcyone: Sometimes referred to as Halcyone, this Sister was seduced by Poseidon and gave birth to Hyrieus, the name of Orion's father...but who may or may not be the same Hyrieus. Alcyone is also known as the "Central One," the "Hen" and the "Queen Who Wards Off Evil Storms."

Asterope: Sometimes referred to as Sterope, one legend tells that this Sister was ravished by Ares and gave birth to Oenomaus, King of Pisa. Other legends state that she was instead the wife of Oenomaus and may have been the mother of the beautiful Hippodaima in addition to bearing three sons, Leucippus, Hippodamus and Dysponteus, Founder of Dyspontium. At one time, this Sister may have been known as "Asterie of the Starry Sky," a title which has been linked to the Creatrix of the Universe.

Celeno: Sometimes also referred to as Celaeno, this Sister was seduced by Poseidon and is credited with being the mother of Lycus (the "Wolf") and Chimaerus (the "He-Goat"), courtesy of a liaison with Prometheus. Her name means "swarthy" and, according to some sources, she is believed to have been struck by lightning.

Electra: Sometimes also referred to as Eleckra, this Sister was the wife of Corythus. She was seduced by Zeus and gave birth to Dardanus, Founder of Troy. Electra may have also been the mother of the Harpies...foul bird-women who lived in a Cretan cave and harried criminals. However, it is possible that the Electra who gave birth to the Harpies was an entirely different Ocean Nymph who simply bore the same name. The name Electra means "amber," "shining," and/or "bright" and may be the origin of the modern term "electricity."

Maia: The eldest and most beautiful of the Sisters, Maia was a Mountain Nymph who resided in Arcadia. Seduced by Zeus, she gave birth to the Messenger God, Hermes, and later became foster-mother to Arcas, son of Zeus and Callisto, during the period Callisto was in the guise of a bear. Maia is also sometimes referred to as "Mother," "Grandmother," "Nurse" and/or "The Great One."

Merope: Often referred to as "The Missing One" or "Lost Pleiades," Merope was the seventh of the Sisters and (according to one fable) the wife of Sisyphus, grandson of Deucalion (the Greek Noah) and great-grandson of Prometheus. Sisyphus founded the City of Ephyre, also known as Corinth, but was later condemned by Zeus to eternally roll a huge stone up a hill in Hades, only to have it roll back down each time the task was almost completed. Legend tells that Merope repents of this marital indiscretion and hides her face in shame at being the only one of the Sisters who failed to cohabitate with a God. Her name may have originally meant either "eloquent," "bee-eater" or "mortal."

Sterope: the mother of Oenomaus. Ares, the god of war, was his father. The ancestress of the Eleian and Mykenaian royal families.

Taygate: Sometimes referred to Taygeta, this Sister consecrated to Artemis the Cerynitian Hind with the golden horns that Heracles (during his Third Labor) had to fetch. Seduced by Zeus, she gave birth to Lacedemon, the Founder of Sparta, to which City she was thus an important Goddess. In some versions of this myth, Taygete was unwilling to yield to Zeus and was changed by Artemis into a hind (female red deer). Although Taygete attempted to elude the mighty God in this guise, he eventually caught her and, upon the birth of Lacedemon, she hanged herself. She may also have been the mother of Tantalus, who was tormented in Hades with thirst and hunger for offending the Gods...but there is a great deal of mythological uncertainty surrounding the parentage of Tantalus. The name Taygete possibly means "long-necked."

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Some Names of Nymphs


Abararea – According to Homer’s Iliad she is the consort of Bucolion and the mother of Aesepus and Padasus.
Affric – See Water Faeries, Affric.
Aganippe – See Water Faeries, Aganippe.
AEgina – See Water Faeries, AEgina.
AEgle – In Greek mythology there are 3 different nymphs with this name: one of the Hesperides who was transformed into one of that constellation’s stars; one of the most beautiful of the Naiades; the nymph who stole Thesuis’s love from Ariadne. Adrastea – The nymph of ancient Crete who was baby Jupiter’s wet nurse, she lived in a Dictaean grotto.
Alsaieds - Wood and tree nymphs.
Amaltheia, Amalthea – The nymph who suckled baby Zeus, king of the Greek gods of Olympus.
Amphritrite, Amphytrite – See Water Faeries, Amphritrite.
Antiope – See Water Faeries, Antiope.
Arethusa – See Water Faeries, Arethusa.
Argyra – The nymph who was loved by Solemnos the shepherd.
Asia – See Water Faeries, Asia.
Britomartis – A nymph of Crete who threw herself into the Mediterranean to escape the pursuit of King Minos just to be caught in the nets of some fishermen.
Callisto (aka Kallisto) – The nymph attendant of Artemis who was seduced by Zues in disguise. In a jealous rage, Hera, queen of the gods, changed Callisto into a she-bear. Arcas, Callisto’s son and a hunter of bears, would have killed her if Zues hadn’t changed them into the constellations of Ursa Major (Callisto) and Ursa Minor (Arcas).
Calypso (aka Kalypso) – See Water Faeries, Calypso.
Carmenae - the fourteen nymphs of childbirth.
Cassotis and Castalia – See Water Faeries, Cassotis.
Chelone – She is the nymph condemned to exist as a tortoise by Mercury because she made fun of the king and queen of the gods’, Jupiter and Juno’s, wedding ceremony.
Chih Nu – The celestial Chinese Weaving Maid who makes the cloth for the robes of the gods. There are several versions of her story. In one she was banished to earth where she lived with the head of a herd of oxen, and they were then transformed into the stars Vega and Altair. In another version, she and her sister see things on the earth that make them leave heaven and go there to bathe. While they were bathing a bull had learned that he could win Chih Nu’s love by stealing her celestial garments, so he did. While she and the leader of the herd of cows lived in bliss, the gods couldn’t have any more fine clothes made, so she was recalled to heaven. Her lover pursued her wrapped in the skin of the magic cow, but the celestial guards stopped him. The Jade Emperor took pity on them and allowed them to meet once per year across a bridge made from the wings of magpies.
Clytie (aka Klytie) – See Water Faeries, Clytie.
Coronis – One of the Hyades nymphs, she was one of Apollo’s lovers. She is the mother of Aesculapius, one of Jason’s Argonauts.
Corycia – One of Apollo’s nymph lovers and, by him, the mother of Lycorus.
Cyane – She is a nymph who lived in the countryside of Sicily until Hades turned her into a fountain for helping Persephone try to escape.
Cymodoce – A Nereid nymph mentioned by Virgil and by Spencer in his work The Faerie Queen.
Cymothoe – See Water Faeries, Cymothoe.
Cyrene – See Water Faeries, Cyrene.
Daphne – See Water Faeries, Daphne.
Diuturna – See Water Faeries, Diuturna.
Doris – See Water Faeries, Doris.
Dryope – The mother of Apollo’s son Amphissos who built a temple to his father. When Dryope visited the temple she was carried off by her childhood tutors, the Hamadryads, and a poplar tree was left on the grounds in her place.
Echemais – Also known as Xenaea or Lyca, she was loved by Daphnis the shepherd.
Egeria, Aegeria – The Camanae nymph guardian of pregnant women and childbirth. Legend says that Egeria favored Rome’s second king, Numa Pompilius, who reigned from 753 – 673 B.C. with her wise counsel, so giving her name to female counselors in state office, and was so grief-stricken by his death that the goddess Diana changed her into a fountain.
Erytheia – One of the Hesperides who became a star in the constellation of the same name.
Eunice – See Water Faeries, Eunice.
Eurynome – See Water Faeries, Eurynome.
Galatea – See Water Faeries, Galatea.
Hagno – She, along with her sisters Neda and Thisoa, provided young Jupiter, the king of the gods, with his education.
Huldra – See Earth Faeries, Huldra.
Lodona – See Water Faeries, Lodona.
Lotis, Lotus – The nymph of Roman and Greek mythology who was changed into a lotus plant when she asked the gods to help her escape from Priapus’ pursuit.
Marica – See Water Faeries, Marica.
Melobosis – The guardian nymph of sheep.
Memphis – See Water Faeries, Memphis.
Menara – A celestial nymph of Hindu mythology sent to distract Visvamitra from his devotions.
Mera – One of the lovers of the king of the gods in Greece and Rome.
Muma Pudura – See Earth Faeries, Muma Pudura.
Myrene (aka Myrsine) – The nymph who was transformed into the myrtle tree. In Greek mythology she beat the goddess Athena in a race, and in a fit of rage, Athena turned Myrsine into the Myrtle tree. Later, out of guilt, the goddess took the tree as her emblem. According to the Romans, Myrene was an attendant of Venus who transformed the nymph for wanting to leave the goddess and marry her lover.
Nimue (aka Niniane, Vivienne, and The Lady of the Lake) - See Water Faeries, Lady of the Lake.
Oenone, Oenone, Oinone – See Earth Faeries, Oenone.
Orithyia, Oreithyia – She was the lover of Boreas, the god of the north wind, and mother of their two sons, Zetes and Calais. The sons became the winged warrior companions of Jason and his Argonauts on his epic voyage.
Ouphe – See Earth Faeries, Ouphe.
Pirene – The nymph of Greek and Roman mythology whose unending grief for the loss of her son transformed her into a fountain near Corinth.
Pitys – A nymph who was in love with and loved by the god of nature, Pan. However, the god of the north, Boreas, lover her also, and in a fit of jealousy he blew her off a cliff. On the spot where she landed, she was turned into a pine tree and was there after the sacred tree of Pan.
Sakuntala – She is a heavenly nymph of India, also known as Shakuntala, she was the lover of King Dushyanta and mother to King Bharta. You can learn more about her in the Maharbharata.
Salmacis, Salmachis, Salmakis – See Water Faeries, Salmacis.
Scylla – See Water Faeries, Scylla.
Smilax – A nymph of Greek and Roman mythology who a young mortal named Crocus fell in love with. Unable to be with her, Crocus pined himself into becoming the saffron flower and Smilax later became a yew tree.
Staphyle – The nymph lover of Dionysus.
Syrinx – See Water Faeries, Syrinx.
Thetis – See Water Faeries, Thetis.
Urvasi, Urvashi – See Water Faeries, Urvasi.
Vrikshakas – See Earth Faeries, Vrikshakas.
Xanas – A kind of nymph or faerie of Asturias, they are derived from Celtic mythology. They live near streams and spend their days singing beautiful songs while combing their luxurious hair.

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Nymphs by Domain


AirSylphs
ArtsMuses
Prophesy & ChildbirthCarmenae.
Meadows and ValleysKollimalaikanniyarka, Oread
ParadiseDevas, Gandharvas, Houri
Stars – Anitsutsa, Atlantides, Hesperides, Hyades, Pleiades
Trees and WoodsAlsaieds, Dryads, Hamadryads, Hylaeorae, Meliades, Moss Maidens, Napaeae
WaterApsaras, Cremae, Limenia, Limnae, Naiads, Nereids, Oceanids, Pagae, Suire, Undine

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