The links below will take you to the Faery Directory
where you can search for faeries by name:


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P S R S U V W Y Z



Attorcroppe – A very mean little snake-like being with arms that walks around on legs. Their name literally means “little poison head,” and they may just be nothing more than Saxony fear forms.

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Ballybogs – (aka Bogles, Peat Faeries, Mudbogs, Bog-a-boo, Boggies, and Boggans) – These tiny mud-covered creatures of Ireland are solitary beings who can either be helpful or a hindrance, depending on their mood. They have round, bulbous bodies and heads with no necks, and skinny stick-like legs and arms. Because they’re rather stupid their speech is unintelligible, making it difficult to ascertain their temperament. Their only known area of magickal assistance is in finding good quality peat, if you can understand what they’re saying.

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Bogles, Boggles, Boggle Boos – Mischievous goblins of Northern England who are known locally as Bogills, Bugells, and Bugils. The Welsh names for these spirits are Bo-lol, Bwgwl, and Bygel Nos, and in Scotland they are simply called Bogils. They are shape shifters who have been encountered in the forms of a gloomy, dark mist hovering over a deserted road, a large Black Dog, an oddly animated sack of corn, and in the shape of a human that would quickly disappear. They are protective champions to widows and those who are fatherless, and the dangerous enemies of murderers, liars, and thieves.

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Black Dogs – Huge shaggy-haired dogs, about the size of a calf, with large eyes that glow a fiery red. They are usually encountered on secluded railroad tracks, ancient roads and crossroads, bridges, and in entranceways – the places of transition in human lives. They’re believed, by some, to be the guardians of ancient treasure or sacred grounds, and are usually harmless if left alone. If one should attempt to attack a Black Dog they will be punished with savage wounds, paralysis, or even death. They are very powerful creatures known for being capable of both maliciousness and benevolence towards humans. Although the sight of one is said to portend death within a year, they are well known for guiding lost travelers and frightened females who are traveling alone, to safety.

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Black Shuck – A spirit also known as Shuck, Shuck Dog, or Old Shuck, whose behavior and temperament are like that of the Black Dogs in East Anglia, England. They usually appear as an enormous shaggy black hound, the size of a donkey, with either tow glowing red eyes or a single eye that emits a shower of red or green sparks. It has also been seen in the form of a human monk with the head of a dog, and, in an area of Cambridgeshire, with the face of a monkey (there it is known as the Shuck-Monkey). They reside in salt marshes and the sea, emerging at dusk to roam around the marshes, roadways, riverbanks, and graveyards. Should it decide to accompany one traveling upon the road, its presence can be felt by the brush of its icy breath and shaggy coat. They are harmless if left alone and deadly if challenged. In Norflok, the sight of a Black Shuck is enough to cause illness or death, but in Essex the Shuck is a kind and helpful spirit who will come to the defense of those who are being attacked and guide those who are lost to safety.

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Bean-Tighe – Very kind and gentle housekeeping spirits of Ireland who appear as tiny elderly women dressed in the old-style garments of peasants. They love to inhabit human homes and help mothers tend to the children, pets, and household chores. If you live in a rural setting in a home with children and a fireplace you may be able to get a Bean-Tighe to take up residence at your hearthside, especially if you are of Milesian blood. Call to one with an offering of strawberries and cream and even if she decides not to stay, she will bless your home and lend her energy to spells of fertility and protection of your home, children, and pets.

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Boggarts (aka Bag, Boggard, Buggard, Hobgoblin, Goblin, Gobelin, Boogey Man, Bogy/Bogey-Beast, Boogies, Padfoot, Hobber, Gob, Bogyman, Blob, and Boggan – A distorted squat male dwarf who loves to inhabit people’s homes to torment them and destroy their things. This Scottish pest loves to eat smooth wood, like a termite, and frighten humans by pulling on their clothes, rearranging furniture, and tapping on and slamming doors poltergeist style. In fact, the only way to rid your home of one is by performing an exorcism. If you must see one visit an infested home on the astral plane and make sure one doesn’t follow you home when you leave!

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Bogy/Bogey-Beast {aka Bog, Bogge, Bogie, Boguey, Bogyman, Booger Man, Booman, Budge Fur, Barguest, Brag, Buggan/e, Gytrash/Guytrash, Hedley-Kow, Mumpoker, Padfoot, Ronguer d’Os, Tanterabogus, Trash (aka Skryker), just to name a few.} – A class of English goblin renowned for their lack of intelligence and are described as being small, black, and hairy. Though sometimes dangerous, they are usually just makers of mischief whose evil intentions are easily foiled by quick-witted humans. In Germany they are called Bumann and Boggelman, in Ireland, Bocan or Puca, and, in Bohemia, they are called Bubak.

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Boogey Man/Bogyman – The British Booger Man who terrorizes lone night travelers on desolate roads by appearing, from out of nowhere, as a grotesquely disfigured human. In Scotland’s Orkney and Shetland Islands he’s also known as the Booman.

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Gobelins – A benevolent brownie-like spirit of Normandy, France who looks like a little old man.

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Barguest, Boguest, Barghest – A shape shifting spirit of Northumberland, Durham, and Yorkshire, England. He attaches himself to a particular area and serves as an omen of disaster or death to one who sees him or his family. It has been seen in many forms, among them: a large black mastiff with horns, fangs, and fiery eyes; a huge shaggy-haired dog or bear with long sharp claws and glowing red eyes; a headless man or woman; a white rabbit, cat or dog that disappears in a burst of flames. Sometimes it is dragging chains, though occasionally it is wrapped in them. Anyone who tries to approach it will receive horrible wounds that will never heal.

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Brag – A shape shifting malicious spirit of northern England who usually appears in fields, on moorland, and on lonely roads. He usually appears in the form of a horse or other animal to mislead travelers into perilous situations.

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Buggan/e – A highly dangerous and vicious goblin of the Isle of Man who is an adept shape shifter. It can appear in the form of a male giant, with or without a head, a black calf or cow lying in the road with or without a head and/or tail, or as a large shaggy-haired dog with a white collar and huge glowing red eyes.

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Hedley-Kow – William Henderson, in Folk-Lore of the Northern Counties describes this being, and what he does, perfectly:

“The Hedley-Kow was a bogie, mischievous rather than malignant, which haunted the village of Hedley, near Ebchester. His appearance was never very alarming, and he used to end his frolics with a horses-laugh at the expense of his victims. He would present himself to some old dame gathering sticks, in the form of a truss of straw, which she would become sure to take up and carry away. Then it would become so heavy she would have to lay her burden down, on which the straw would become ‘quick’, rise upright, and shuffle away before her, till at last it vanished from her sight with a laugh and shout. Again, in the shape of a favourite cow, the sprite would lead the milkmaid a long chase round the field, and after kicking and routing during milking-time would upset the pail, slip clear of the tie, and vanish with a loud laugh. Indeed the ‘Kow’ must have been a great nuisance in a farmhouse, for it is said to have constantly imitated the voice of the servant girl’s lovers, overturned the kail-pot, given the cream to the cats, unraveled the knitting, or put the spinning-wheel out of order. But the sprite made himself most obnoxious at the birth of a child. He would torment the man who rode for the howdie, frightening the horse, and often making him upset both messenger and howdie, and leave them in the road. Then he would mock the gudewife, and, when her angry husband rushed out with a shtick to drive away the ‘Kow’ from the door or window, the stick would be snatched from him, and lustily applied to his own shoulders.”

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Padfoot – A bogie spirit, also known as Padfooits, who haunts the moors around Leeds. It appears in the form of a supernatural sheep with shaggy fur and fiery red eyes or as a bundle of wool rolling along the road, or in the form of a large white dog or black donkey with big glowing eyes. It’s said to be a death warning, sometimes visible, sometimes not, that eerily pads along behind or beside its victim roaring or rattling chains, often scaring the human to death. Padfoot is only one of many “frittenings,” others include Barguest, Skryker, Trash, Gytrash, and Ronguer d’Os.

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Skryker (aka Trash) – The Lancashire bogie beast who appears in the form of a huge dog with large feet and saucer eyes, nicknamed Trash for the squelching sound of his walk, who is sometimes invisible. When it chooses to appear it usually does so in front of lonely travelers inexorably drawing them to it. When invisible it eerily walks along beside its victim, constantly moaning and howling, or it may be heard shrieking in the woods. To see it is an omen of impending misfortune; to try and hit it brings instantaneous disaster or death.

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Gytrash/Guytrash – The Northern England road spirit who can shape shift into any form it chooses. It is an evil portent of death and disaster that terrorizes travelers who are too slow to get away.

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Ronguer d’Os – An evil spirit of Normandy, France whose name means “Gnawer of Bones,” and usually manifests in the form of a dog. He is very similar to the Gytrash of England, delighting in the torment of lonely travelers.

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Brownie



The Scottish brownie is definitely one of the kindest and most benevolent of the faeries. These small male dwarves have long, nimble fingers, slightly pointed ears, eyes as black as coal, brown faces and shaggy heads. Brownies can be either naked and covered with long hair or clothed in a ragged brown, blue, or green suit and felt cap, or, more often, in a brown hooded cape. There are some brownies who have no noses, but only two nostrils, known as Dobies, and in some regions their fingers are webbed or joined completely, apart from the thumb. All brownies are helpful and industrious house spirits who attach themselves one to a family and emerge at night to perform any unfinished chores. They make themselves responsible for the farm or house in which they live, plowing, reaping, herding sheep, grinding grain, churning butter, cleaning the barn and house, running errands, and giving good advice when needed. Brownies also tend to become personally attached to one member of the family. The correct etiquette for paying them for their helpfulness is to leave them some fresh cream, just-baked cake, honey, or ale in a place where they might “accidentally” find it.

When choosing a home, brownies look for humans that they consider worthy of their services - those who are humble, polite, and kind and respectful towards nature and other people. They like warm cozy homes with no cats, have been known to chase evil spirits out of their adopted homes, and may even make you a pair of shoes. They, however, have no tolerance for misers, cheats, liars, and those who are pretentious. Brownies are very intelligent, except for the very gentle and kind-hearted well-meaning Dobies who, unfortunately, tend to be more of a nuisance than anything else. But, a gift of new clothing is a kindly way to offend any brownie, Dobies included, into leaving. Complaining about the quality of their work will also make them leave, but not before they destroy your home in a vengeful rage.

To establish contact with a brownie try leaving out gifts of their favorite foods, or by visiting Faeryland, they will only come to you if they are certain you are their type of person and deserving of their loyalty and friendship. Their energy is a powerful boost to magick centered around protecting one’s home, family, and farm animals, as well as to prosperity magick. They will help you with any request they deem proper. The best way to get a brownie to work with you is make your astral home warm and inviting to them, and over time you will begin to trust one another and start doing nice things for each other, the relationship will surely grow from there.

Other names for these delightful creatures are Nis (Danish), Domovoi (Russian), Yumboes (North African), Choa Phum Phi (Chinese), Hob (English), Bwca (Welsh), Bodach (Scottish Highlands), Phynnodderee (Manx), Lob, Broonie, Browney, Bwouny, and Browny. Some well known individual brownies are: Robin Goodfellow, Hiken Drum, Meg Moulach, Maggy Moloch, Puddlefoot, Brownie-Clod, The Cauld Lad of Hilton, Killmoulis, and Master Dobbs, among others.

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Dobie, Dobbie, Dobby – These little guys are more lazy, gullible, and stupid than their brownie cousins, and are more likely to play mischievous pranks than work. Unattached Dobies have even been known to be malevolent towards humans, lurking around rivers and isolated ruins to pounce on unsuspecting travelers and strangle them.

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Domovoi, Domovik, Domovoj – This household spirit of Russia and the Ukraine is a shape shifter who usually appears in the form of a man with a gray beard and a hairy body. He usually lives by one’s hearth and sometimes has a wife called a Domikha who lives beneath the floorboards. They love fire and warmth, and their happiness is insured by leaving them a portion of the evening meal, for, if offended they’ll gleefully burn down the house. If the Domovoi’s family should move he will accompany them and ring a brand from the old fire with which to light the new one. They are never referred to directly, but always with the use of a euphemism such as chelovek (fellow), or Dedushka, Dedko (grandfather). As with all brownies, they work through the night wrapping up any unfinished chores. Their main service is to warn the family of any impending problems and defending the household against any human or other evil-spirited invaders, even to the pint of killing them. The Domovoi is also the family fortune teller: If he brushes a person in the dark and they feel a warm, fuzzy sensation, their luck will be good, but if the feeling is cold and clammy bad luck is ahead. They will also favor some members of the household over others, bestowing good fortune on some and playing tricks on others.

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Hob, Hobbe, Hobby, Hobredy, and Hobany – A class of kindly, beneficient and sometimes mischievous spirits who invisibly work through the night to aid families in need. Though they resemble brownies, in that they tend to be brown naked, and covered with hair, they tend to specialize in particular types of work, as opposed to their jacks-of-all-trades cousins. One of them, known as Hobhole Hob, was renowned for curing whooping cough. Parents would bring their sick children into his cave and whisper,

“Hobhole Hob! Hobhole Hob!
Ma bairns gotten t’kink cough,
Tak’t off; tak’t off,”

and the child would be cured.

There is one tale of a sinister hob, Hob Headless, who haunted the road between Hurworth and Neasham in North Yorkshire, but couldn’t cross the Kent river that flowed into the trees. His many activities included pouncing on unsuspecting travelers, changing the direction of signposts, and causing vehicles to skid on the road. He was eventually exorcised and laid and banished to a hole beneath a large stone by the roadside for 99 years and a day. The stone itself is now cursed, and anyone who sits on it will never be able to get off of it. The 99 years is just about up, so there may soon be more tales of trouble about the road from Neasham to Hurworth.

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Nis, Nisse – The household spirit of Denmark and Norway, known in Sweden as Tomte Gubbe. He’s a little fellow who dresses in gray clothing and a pointed red cap. He doesn’t like noise and fuss, but he works diligently during the night on household chores, expecting only a bowl of porridge with a pat of butter as a reward. Unlike the brownie, the farm or household where the Nis resides may profit by his stealing from their neighbors. If they are offended or have their routine disrupted they will exact revenge upon the perpetrators, so be aware.

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Bodach, Bodach Glas – A most decidedly malevolent brownie of the Scottish Highlands whose name means Old Man. He is notorious for entering human’s homes in the night and carrying off their children. In his more sinister aspect as the spirit known as Bodach Glas, the Dark Gray Man, he is a potent of a family member’s imminent death.

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Bodachan Sabhaill – The “Little Old Man of the Barn” in Ireland, the Isle of Man, and the Hebrides Islands, who inhabits farm buildings. He assists old farmhands with threshing the fields, to help them keep up with the young’uns.

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Browney – The Cornish guardian of honeybees. When the bees swarm, in early summer, one can beat on a can and call, “Browney! Browney!” and he will come, invisibly, to help the bees safely into their hives.

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Aiken Drum (a.k.a. Haiken Drum) – This is the Scottish brownie who inhabited Blednoch in Galloway. Dressed in nothing but a kilt made of green rushes he would complete all of the chores left undone by the humans at dusk. His name is best known in the Scottish nursery rhyme:

“There cam’ a man to oor toun,
To oor toun, to oor toun,
There cam’ a man to oor toun
An’ his name was Aiken Drum.”
(For the rest of the rhyme click here.)

But, when given new clothes as payment for his work, like all such brownies, he left that area forever.

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Brownie Clod – The Dobie son of Mieg Moulach who inhabited the old farmhouse of Achmarrow at Glenlivet in Banff, Scotland. He was so stupid that even the servants played tricks on him!

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The Cauld Lad of Hilton – The half brownie, half ghost domestic spirit who inhabited the Castle of Hilton in Northumberland, England. He was believed to be the spirit of a stable boy killed b the Baron Hilton, in a fit of rage, for failing to saddle up a horse on time. The legend tells how the baron then hid the body and sunk it to the bottom of the estate pond. Many years later, when the pond was drained, the skeleton of a boy was found. Although he was never seen, the boy could be heard finishing the servants’ chores in the night, while sadly singing:

“Wae’s me, wae’s me;
The acorns not yet
Fallen from the tree,
That’s to grow the wood,
That’s to make the cradle
That’s to rock the bairn
That’s to grow a man,
That’s to lay me.”

But, his sorrow was for naught, for, because of his tendency to mess up whatever had been left tidy, the servants gave him a green cloak and hood. That night, at midnight, he was heard dancing about in his new clothes until sunrise, singing:

“Here’s a cloak and here’s a hood,
The Cauld Lad of Hilton will do nae mair good!”

And with the day’s dawning he vanished forever.

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Heinzelmann, Heinzelmmanchen – Friendly household spirits of Cologne, Germany who work in bakeries and other trades shops, during the night, with such great skill that the masters would require fewer assistants. They have never been seen, but their craftsmanship and help is always accepted and appreciated.

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Kaboutermannekin – The Dutch brownie who appears either naked and hairy, or dressed in old and dusty red clothes and a cap. He works during the night grinding corn, storing sacks of flour, and resetting worn grindstones in farmers’ mills in exchange for a slice of buttered bread and a glass of beer.

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Killmoulis – This spirit inhabited the flourmills of the Scottish Lowlands and was rather grotesque in appearance, having an enormous nose and no mouth. According to the rhyme:

“Auld Killmoulis wanting the mow,
Come to me now, come to me now!
Where war ye yestreen when I killed the sow?
Had ye come ye’d hae gotten yer belly fou.”

His nose was used for snuffing up his food. He was very devoted to the welfare of the miller and his family, and would cry like a banshee to warn of illness or misfortune, but he had a mischievous streak, as well. He delighted in playing practical jokes, like blowing ashes on the shelled oats that had been spread out to dry. The above incantation would summon the killmoulis and stop his prankish behavior. He would help with things like thrashing the corn, or riding for a midwife (a howdie) if the miller’s wife were in need, and was also used in divination on Halloween. His place in the home where he liked to live was the killogee, the space in front of the fireplace in the kiln.

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Maggy/ie Moloch – The brownie of the mill at Fincastle in Perthshire, Scotland. She may be a variant of Mieg Moulach.

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Master Dobbs – The Sussex brownie who is especially kind and caring towards elderly folks.

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Mieg Moulach – This brownie, also known as Hairy Meg, Maug Mouladch, Maggy or May Moloch, and Meg Molloch, was attached to the Grant family of Strathsprey in Scotland. Not only did she perform the usual brownie labors for the household, she also helped the clan chief beat his opponents at chess, and announced the death of family members by wailing like a banshee.

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Puddlefoot – This is the brownie of Clochflodich Farm, near Pitlochry in Tayside, Scotland, who inhabited the pools of Altmor Burn, a stream close to the property. He got his name because he would splash and paddle about in the stream before waddling up to farm and leave his wet footprints everywhere. Thus it was always obvious who had been finishing the undone chores and making a mess of those that had been finished. One night a drunken man on his way home from Dunkeld heard him playing in the burn and called to him, “Hoo is’t with thee noo, Puddlefoot?” This horrified the brownie and he moaned, “Oh, oh, I have gotten a name. It’s Puddlefoot they call me!” whereupon he was never seen or heard of again.

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Tontii – The Finnish household spirit who rewards families that provide him with the best accommodations and table in the house, by bestowing wealth and an abundant harvest upon them, often at their neighbor’s expense.

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Buachailleen – These small male faeries are very adept at shape shifting and have a mischievous nature that leans toward the mean side. These “Herding Boys” get their jollies from tormenting animals, especially playing pranks on the sheep and shepherds of the herds they live among in the summertime.

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Bugul Noz - A solitary, one-of-a-kind faery who resides in the woods of Brittany and is hardly ever seen. He prefers to hide in his underground home, and always announces his arrival with a warning call, because he is ashamed of his repulsively hideous looks. He may be a very powerful assistant in Earth Magick and would more than welcome your friendly company and compassion.

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Buttery Sprites/Spirits – These spirits are the nonreligious form of the Abbey Lubbers. Though considered to be malevolent, they are actually completely harmless to and, in fact, disinterested in humans who are honest and kind towards others. They are only able to survive in the storerooms and cellars (butteries) of inns, taverns, and country houses that are owned and run by inhospitable, miserly, and dishonest proprietors. In these situations they thrive and grow fat on the business owner’s greed by consuming his stores of food that have been prepared from unhealthy livestock and rotten produce, causing the establishment to suffer great financial losses.

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Abbey Lubber – These spirits live in the wine cellars or, as in the case of Friar Rush, the kitchens of abbeys and other religious houses inhabited by monks who were prone to be gluttonous, wanton, lascivious drunkards. These spirits would disappear from the abbeys when the friars repented and began leading a virtuous life.

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Friar Rush – A spirit who, in the guise of a friar, was sent on orders from the devil to tempt an abbey’s holy men, who he successfully lads into a life of gluttony, lechery, and laziness. Eventually the holy Prior notices Friar Rush’s cow’s tail, cloven feet, and hooked nails, thus unmasking him, transforming him into a horse, and expelling him from the abbey. The friar’s then repent and reform their evil ways, becoming even more virtuous than before.

After being expelled from the abbey, Rush becomes a more benevolent spirit, developing a pleasure for the company of rustics in the local taverns, and eventually goes to serve a human master. While working diligently to help his new master he also plays tricks on him when he is making love to his mistress. Friar Rush then becomes so helpful and kind that he tells the lascivious monk that his mistress is possessed by the devil and recommends that he send her to the now-reformed abbot for an exorcism. This treachery gets him banished from Hell and, not being eligible for Heaven, leaves him to exist as a form of Ingus Fatuus.

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Bwbach, Bwbachod – A Welsh spirit who very closely resembles the English brownie in behavior and appearance. They will move into a home and perform household chores at night, and become malicious and prone to behave like a poltergeist when affronted or annoyed. They especially dislike teetotalers and hypocritical holy men. One story tells of Cardiganshire Bwbach who harassed a Baptist preacher by jerking his prayer stool out from under his elbows while he was kneeling, interrupting his prayers by clattering the fire-irons or grinning at him through the window, and, finally, scaring him off by manifesting as his double, a portent of one’s imminent death.

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Callicantzaroi, Kallikantzari – These are a group of tiny, skinny, and hairy beings with long tails, the feet of animals, and no or little eyesight, who move around by riding on the backs of chickens. They wear headgear while out on their rades, and are especially active when they exuberantly celebrate the Sun God’s rebirth at Yule. Their favorite food is pork and the burning of an old shoe will drive them away. They are usually with a variety of other cripple faeries, while out on their rades, enjoying the frightful sight that the blend of their grotesque appearances creates.

The Kallikantzari of Greece are particularly malignant towards humans, putting out unattended winter fires with their urine, wreaking havoc in people’s homes, and stealing all their good food from Christmas dinner tables. In a ploy to attack humans, they try to get them to divulge their names, a trick easily foibled with a response of “I myself.” The Callicanzaroi of Albania and Italy seem to be content with polluting fresh water sources, but hyssop is said to restore its purity.

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Chin-Chin Kobakama – These Japanese elves are both male and female with wizened faces and gray hair, and are incredibly nimble and fast. They move into people’s homes and, in brownie-like fashion, will help maintain the cleanliness of its floors and rugs. They will also bless and protect a home, if it is well kept. They are most active during the day and have been known to harass sloppy children and housekeepers.

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Churn Milk Peg – A small female dwarf who guards unripe nut thickets, hazelnuts in particular, and whose presence can be detected by the smoke coming out of her tiny pipe. She is highly prone to whimsy and dresses in the peasant clothing of fifteenth century England. If you should happen to pick a nut from the tree that she is guarding before it’s ripe she will punish you with cramps and bloating. So, if you pick one and feel a definite pinch, know that she has seen you, and don’t eat the nut! Peg will also pinch people who she catches lazing about or daydreaming beneath her tree, for she can’t abide laziness, and will sometimes chase them off, as well. She is most active from spring to autumn and is considered, by some, to be a goddess of fertility in association with Beltaine. To appeal to her use milk, fruit, and nuts as an offering during a ritual invitation to your circle, but use caution.

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Melch Dick, Melsh Dick – Churn Milk Peg’s male counterpart. He, too, protects unripe nuts. The importance of nuts can be surmised from the supernatural beliefs surrounding them, such as the appearance of the Devil to those who pick them on Sundays, and their being valued as aiding in fertility.

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Cluichauns – Also known as Clupricaune, Cluracan, Cluricaine, Cluracan, Clurachan, Cluttharacan, Monociello, Loghery Man, and Luricadaune. A group of solitary male elves who are described as being little old men dressed in long red pointed caps, red coats with a silver buckle, leather aprons, blue stockings, and silver-buckled high-heeled shoes. They tend to attach themselves to individual’s wine cellars, moving in and appointing themselves as the resident guardian. They are always drunk and generally cheerful, but if you ignore or mistreat them they will destroy your wine cellars and your home. However, if you make them feel welcome, they will protect your wine, cellar, and home against thieves and vandals, while merrily singing Irish folk songs. They’re also said to carry the spre na scillenagh (shilling fortune) or sparan na scillinge (purse of shillings), a purse flowing with silver.

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Monociello – “The Little Monk” of Italy who appears in the form of a stout, paunchy friar, complete with sandals on his feet and a staff in his hand, he wears a bright scarlet cardinal’s habit and matching hat. He lives in houses and mischievously pinches and steals the clothing of its residents. Monociello is said to be the guardian of a great horde of treasure, and that anyone who sees him and can steal his hat will get part of the treasure for its return.

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Cobylnau (a.k.a. Black Dwarves, Wichlein, Gommes, Paras, Knockers, Knackers, and Bucca) – These Welsh mine spirits are described as having either black or copper skin, ugly faces, short bodies, and very benevolent natures, much like the Knockers or Cornwall. To see one is considered to be good luck, but, if anyone stares at one it will throw rocks at the ogler, with invisible hands.

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Paras – This household spirit of Finland is a shape shifter who manifests in the form of a cat or a frog and steals goods, to enrich the home’s owner, from his neighbors.

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Cucui – A large, drooling monster of Northern Mexico who delights in hurting anyone he can get a hold of.

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Domoviyr, Domovoy – There are four subspecies of this faery class, each with a different name and function. First, the Vazila, faeries charged with protecting and tending to horses to the extent that they care for no other creature, including humans. Then we have the Bagan and Ovinnik who live in barns in the guise of a black cat that barks like a dog and laughs like a human. Offerings of baby roosters are given to Ovinniks to stop them from burning down the barn and the kiln is never lit on the feast days of saints or during a high wind. Both Bagans and Ovinniks can be consulted on New Year’s Eve to divine one’s fortune: a soft touch means a good year, a prickly touch indicates misfortune.

The fourth subspecies is the Bannik, guardian spirits of bathhouses and any nearby ponds. They are described as resembling a little old man with a long white beard and hair. They are also adept shape shifters and often materialize in the form of a familiar person, and in a steamy room, so that one would be hard pressed to recognize them. The Bannik is capable of being both incredibly kind and extreme cruel, and anyone who enters the bathhouse when it’s his turn (every fourth session) could end up being peeled or scalded to death. To keep a Bannik happy make offerings of soap, fir branches, and water, and thank him for his presence at the end of each bath. When a new bathhouse is built a sacrificial black hen is buried, unplucked, beneath the bathhouse’s threshold to appease the Bannik. If offended the Bannik has been known to burn the bathhouse down. To avoid this villagers perform a simple ceremony and then exit the bathhouse backwards, bowing and reciting incantations as they leave.

Few humans ever go into Russian bathhouses alone, especially at night; not only is it considered an unclean place, they fear the haunting demons. The Bannik protects the villagers from these unseen forces. Although not a pleasant place, many children are born in bathhouses, and some believe the Bannik to be especially protective of these children; others believe that they will steal unbaptized babies, so the mothers and their infants were never left there alone.

During the festival of Yule the Bannik is consulted in a divination ceremony performed by young village girls. The girls would pull their skirts up and over their heads and stand in the entrance of the bathhouse exposing their buttocks towards the interior. If the Bannik scratched their bottoms it indicated that the coming year would be bad, if he patted or caressed them then the new year would be good. In some villages the local Banniks would give the girls a ring as a sign of good fortune, or trap all of her fingers in rings of iron to indicate trouble.

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Duendes – Spanish nightmare spirits who inhabit the fabric of the whitewashed walls of houses and disturb the sleeping residents. They detest humans and love to drive them from their homes so that they may live in them alone.

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Duergarrs – Malicious dwarves who prey on travelers. They dress in lambskin jackets, moleskin shoes, and green moss hats decorated with a pheasant’s feather, and are less than two feet tall. They like to live under hills, in dark woods, and in the rocks of isolated places, and are said to have been created from the maggots that infested the dead body of Ymir. They are intent on bringing about corruption and misery to mankind.

The most well known Duergarars are Modsognir, Durin, and Dvalin. These three are described as having green eyes, long gray beards, powerful and stocky bodies, and crow’s feet. They wear magickal cloaks that could render them invisible, but if they are ever caught in the sunlight they will be turned to stone. The Duergarrs are expert smiths, especially of gold and silver, who make weapons for the gods. Anyone who was to steal one of these divine weapons would die.

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Elves



These beings are known throughout the world, and their names, descriptions, and characteristics vary according to region. In Germany they are called Elb, Erls, Schrat, and Mannikins, in Scandinavia they are the Huldre folk, and it is in England and Scotland that they are referred to as Elves. To the Danish they are the Elle Folk and Ellen, and in Wales they are the Ellyllon. The Swedish have named them Elvor, Grove Folk, and Grove Damsels. In Iceland they are called Spae-wives. Other names and spellings include Aelf, Alfar, Alve, Elve, and Ylf.

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Alfar (aka Alf, Elbern, Ellen, Elven, Elfvor, Aelf) – There are two races of these beings of Scandinavia and Tuetonic mythology, Light and Dark.

The Dockalfar, or Docalfar, whose name means Dark Alfar, are also known as Swartalfar, Svartalfar, or Black Alfs, and are said to have a character and appearance darker than pitch. They were born as maggots who feasted on the flesh of the dead giant Ymir and live underground. They are very powerful beings who apply their energies to acts of evil and destruction and specialize in crafting weapons, and other gifts, for the gods, out of magickally imbued metals. As assistants to the gods, they are also believed to be bringers of fertility and, as such, were once worshipped in a widespread cult.

The Liosalfar, or Light Alfs, are described as having an appearance and character lighter than the sun. They live in Alfheim, a magickally luminous place between earth and the heavens, and are benevolent towards mankind. In Denmark they are known as Elven and Ellen, and in Sweden they are the Elfvor.

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Elf – Tiny, magickal supernaturals who can shape shift at will. In their usual form they appear as short chubby old human men or beautiful young maidens with cow’s tails. They use their powers on humans whenever they can, sometimes to their benefit, as with those of the Seelie Court, and sometimes to their detriment, as with those of the Unseelie Court. They make their homes in hollowed out tree trunks in woodlands, forests, deep mountain caves, and ancient burial mounds, and can be seen dancing in the grass around these areas in the moonlight. The Seelie Court elf community is usually very independent, though there are tales of them asking for human assistance. They are also said to be extremely powerful and capable of exacting terrible punishments upon those who offend them. Those of the Unseelie Court have absolutely no use for humans and are known for stealing infants, cattle, milk, and bread, as well as abducting young men and holding them in enchanted captivity for years at a time, as in the story of Rip Van Winkle. Another popular story about elven magick is that of Rumplestiltskin, which tells of their ability to spin grain into gold. It’s in a poem from Popular Rhymes of Scotland we learn that they don’t like to be called elves or faeries:

Gin ye ca’ me imp or elf
I rede ye look weel to yourself;
Gin ye ca’ me fairy,
I’ll work ye muckle tarrie;
Gin guid neibour ca’ me,
Then guid neibour I will be;
But gin ye ca’ me seelie wicht,
I’ll be your freend baith day and nicht.

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Ellen, Elven, Elle Folk, Elle King – These tiny Danes look like little old men wearing low-crowned hats, or beautiful young women with hollow backs. The men can sometimes be seen sitting near the Elle moors, but it is dangerous to get too close to one, for he will breath a sickness inducing fog onto anyone who ventures near. The women are just as malevolent, enchanting young men, especially young hunters, with the music of their lyres and their sweet, magickal singing. The Ellen live in Elle mounds, human-like monarchies in the woods and forests, where they hold their festivals and weddings. They can usually be found celebrating beneath linden and lime trees, so it is best to avoid these places after sunset, and the remains of ancient oak forests are said to be the transformed soldiers of the Elle King’s army who come to life at night.

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Ellyllon – Tiny fair-skinned beings with blonde hair who dress in flowing garments of diaphanous white silk. They live on faery butter and toadstools in communities in the hills and on islands in lakes where they keep their herds of faery cattle. Their queen is Mab and they possess very powerful magickal abilities. They love cleanliness and will reward those who keep their houses tidy with gifts and good fortune, but they’ll punish those who are dirty and lazy. Because they have a fondness for human children, infants must be carefully watched lest they be swapped for changelings. One group of Ellyllons called the Plant Rhys Ddwfn live on an invisible island off the coast of Dyfed.

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Queen Mab – The English and Welsh Queen of the Faeries, who was the consort of Oberon, emperor of the faeries, and a faery midwife. She is described, by Shakespeare, as being tiny, no larger than an agate stone, and as traveling in an insect-drawn coach:

“O then, I see Queen Mab hath been with you.
She is the fairies’ midwife; and she comes,
In shape no bigger than an agate stone
On the finger of an alderman,
Drawn with a team of little atomies,
Over men’s noses as they lie asleep;
Her wagon spokes made of long spinners’ legs:
The cover, of the wings of grasshoppers;
The traces, of the smallest spider’s web;
The collars of the moonshines’ watery beams;
Her whip of cricket’s bone;
‘the lash of film:
Her wagoner, a small gray-coated gnat,
Not half so big as a round little worm.
-from Romeo and Juliet

Another description of her is given in the following poem by Ben Jonson:

Queen Mab
This is Mab, the mistress Fairy,
That doth nightly rob the dairy,
And can help or hurt the churning,
As she please without discerning.

She that pinches country wenches,
If the rub not clean their benches,
And with sharper nails remembers
When they rake up not their embers:
But if so they chance to feast her,
In a shoe she drops a tester.

This is she that empties cradles,
Takes out children, puts in ladles:
Trains forth midwives in their slumber,
With a sieve the holes to number;
And then leads them from her burrows,
Home through ponds and water-furrows.

She can start our Franklin’s daughters,
In their sleep, with shrieks and laughters;
And on sweet St. Anna’s night,
Feed them with a promised sight,
Some of husbands, some of lovers,
Which an empty dream discovers.


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Oberon – The emperor of the faeries, husband of Titana, who is said to be a dwarf with a beautiful face and a fondness for mischief. He inhabits the woods and forests of England with his sprites led by Puck, and enjoys playing pranks on both faeries and humans. Where humans are concerned he likes to deceive travelers and detain them in faery time. Should one ever encounter Oberon, one would be wise to remain silent and not speak to him, no matter what horrors, storms, and frightening visions he conjures up, for speaking to him will forever trap you in his power. Of Oberon’s wife Titania Shakespeare says:

“A bank whereon the wild thyme blows,
Where oxslips and the nodding violet grow
s, Quite over-canopied with lush woodbine,
With sweet musk-roses, and white eglantine.
There sleeps Titania, some time of the night
Lull’d in these flowers with dances and delight;
And there the snake throws her enamell’d skin,
Weed wide enough to wrap a fairy in.
-from A Midsummer Night’s Dream

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Plant Rhys Ddwfn – The tribe of Welsh faeries who live on an island off of the coast of Dyfed that remains invisible because of a magickal herb that grows profusely there. The faeries, whose name means Children of Rhys Ddwfn, resemble humans. While on their island home they’re very tiny, but once a week they transform to the size of mortals to shop in the local marketplace. They are very honest and are wealthy enough to pay higher prices for goods than the locals can afford, making it difficult for some of the poorer shoppers, their purchases causing the merchants to inflate their prices.

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Grove Folk, Grove Damsels, Elvor – These Swedish elves are, like the Dryads of ancient Greek mythology, the guardian spirits of the woods and forests who live in the trees.

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Mannikins – These European Little People live in communities similar to humans, in the abandoned ruins of human castles, churches, and other fine, but crumbled and neglected, places. They are said to be tiny, youthful beings who love to dance, sing, and play music. They love to eat cream, eggs, bread, and other treats from a farmer’s kitchen, but always repay the family by threshing, reaping, baling hay, or sweeping the barn.

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Spae-wives, Elf Damsels –These female elves of Iceland are described as being tiny peasant women who live in ancient burial mounds, long barrows, and other sacred mounds. They are experts in herbal magick and healing.

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Elven Phenomena



Elf Arrows – Neolithic arrowheads that elves shoot at humans.
Elf Bolt – A disease of farm animals caused by Elf Arrows.
Elf Bore – A piece of wood that is missing the knot(s).
Elf Cake – A disease elves inflict upon humans that causes the spleen to enlarge.
Elf Child – A changeling.
Elf Cup – A stone that has been hollowed out by dripping water.
Elf Fire – Will o’ the Wisp.
Elf Locks – Tangles and knots in the hair caused by elves playing with your hair at night.
Elf Marked – Birth marks and other natural birth defects caused by mischievous elves.
Elf Taken – Bewitched or enchanted humans.
Elf Twisted – Elf-inflicted strokes and other attacks that leave humans in a state of deformity or fasciations; deformed vegetation.

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Erdluite – These web-footed dwarves can’t swim and sink like rocks if they’re put in the water. The men are called Hardmandlene, the women are called Erdbiberli, and they help deserving human farmers by manipulating the weather. They’re usually dressed in smocks and long, hooded cloaks to hide their feet out of shame.

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Fireesin – These Manx faeries are also called Farm Faeries and The Haruesters because they like to help humans maintain their farms. They are solitary faeries who are described as being nude and covered with patches of coarse brown hair, physically unattractive, and very well-meaning, yet stupid. They are most active during the spring, summer, and fall, but their lack of intelligence often makes them more of a nuisance than a help.

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Gandharvas – Very tiny vegetation spirits of India, also known by the Pali name of Gandhabbas, who possess exceptional musical abilities. They are described as being harmless to and disinterested in humans, and appear as either shaggy half-animal beings or fragrant, richly garbed warriors. Their leaders are Visvavasu and Tumburu, and they are the attendants of Apsaras. They are active throughout the year and live in the air, forests, and mountains.

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Gaines – These Italian solitary wood elves are expert weavers who dress in old-fashioned peasant clothing and large, pointed caps made of animal pelts, who sometimes help humans. They inhabit the forests and are powerful spell weavers and seers. Italian folklore says the cloth that they weave with their magick spinning wheels is a potent good luck talisman. Call on them as an oracle to divine your future or for advice on how to best cast a spell.

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Gnomes - These are the elementals who are earth incarnate who are able to move through the earth as easily as a fish swims in the water. Their emperor, Cob, has charged them with guarding the earth’s treasures. They are known throughout the world by many other names, such as Endmanleins and Heinzemannchens in Germany, Nissen in Sweden, Nisse in Denmark and Norway, Tontii in Finland, Foddenskkmaendin (also see Trolls) in Iceland, Gnom in Poland, Djude in Bulgaria and Albania, Mano in Czechoslavakia, Kabouter in Holland, Skritek in Belgium, Kleinmannekin (little men) in Luxembourg, Domovoi Djedoes (earth faeries) in Russia, and Nains in Brittany.

These beings live underground among the intricately woven root systems of old oak trees and in treasure mines. They aren’t immortal, though their average life span is around 1,000 years, and they mature at the relatively young age of 100. There are male and female adults and children and, once they reach adulthood, they resemble little old folks who stand about a foot tall, or less, but are capable of shape shifting to the size of a giant. They clothe themselves in red pointed hats and old-style peasant costumes of green or blue with rainbow-colored stockings that they weave themselves.

Male gnomes grow beards and the females, when married; cover their hair in the way of Orthodox Jews and the Amish. They are highly intelligent, clever, and kind-hearted healers and caretakers of wildlife who have cheery, rosy cheeks, dimpled faces, and kind, loving eyes. Their only known enemies are martens, some species of owls, and humans who destroy forests and other woodlands.

Gnomes automatically come to your circle when you invoke the North during ritual, and lend very powerful energy to all magickal workings, especially those involving healing. Call on them to aid you in a spiritual quest or to bless or enhance the growth of a garden or wild woodland. Should you be in need of guidance, you may try seeking an audience with the Gnome King during Faeryland’s autumn. Gnomes will also help in protection spells for you, your family, and any animals, including house pets, and may even be willing to teach you about herbal healing. They also love to dance to raise energy and would be useful in ritual celebrations of the Gods and Goddesses who rule the forests and woods. Their favorite human food is fresh milk.

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Nain – In Scandinavian mythology this is the name given to the dwarf of death, and, in France, the word means dwarf.

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Golem – A zombie-like Israeli thought-form that has no mind or will of its own.

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Gruaghach – These Scottish faeries, also known as Groagach, Grogach, Grogan, The Herdswoman, The Firesitter, appear in three different types:

In the Scottish Highlands this being is a solitary faery lady with long golden tresses, wearing a green gown and carrying a shepherd’s staff in gnarled hands. Sometimes she is pale and haggard, and sometimes she is beautiful, but she is always a kind-hearted guardian of cattle and farmland, protecting both from the evil Buachailleen. She also travels extensively and is connected with water, often appearing on people’s doorsteps dripping wet, asking if she may dry herself by their fire. If she is welcomed she will protect the home and livestock; if turned away she will create havoc and steal animals.

The second type is the male. They appear as either handsome, slender youths dressed in green or red, or naked and hairy beings, and perform brownie-type work about the farm they choose to inhabit. Both of these first two types are appeased with offerings of milk and by being given a libation during the festivals of Imbolc and Lugnasadh in a hollow stone called a Gruagach’s Stone.

The third type is the Irish Grogan. In the north she behaves like a brownie but, in the south, she is a supernatural female wizard, often a giant, who is desperately searching for a son, and will steal one if she likes him. Of her it is also said that, if asked, her compassion will move her to tearfully return the boy to his rightful parents. But, the male giant who lives on the Isle of Man is evil and behaves in the manner of a Buachailleen.

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Heather Pixies – These Moor Sprites of Scotland and Yorkshire, England are tiny beings with translucent wings and clear or shimmery golden auras that live in the heather that covers the moors. They are mischievous beings who, while not adverse to human contact, don’t seek it out either, and are also said to like spinning flax.

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Hobgoblin (aka Hobgobs, Goblin, Hob-thrush, Billeeboinkers, Bloblins, Gooseys, Brags, Gobelins, Hobs, Lobs, Buachen, Robgoblin, and Hoblinet) – These ugly little elves are characteristically good-humored, benevolent, irrepressibly mischievous nature spirits who are usually helpful and well-disposed to humans, like a brownie, and they love a warm fire. They, however, can not abide those who are lazy and/or miserly and will pinch and play spiteful pranks on them, as well as on those who they find otherwise offensive.

The Wee Little Hobgoblin

One wee little Hobgoblin
All dressed up in red,
Was spying on a farmhouse
With mischief in his head.
“This place,” said the little Hobgoblin,
“It could be lots of fun.
Everything’s so clean and tidy,
And begging to be undone.”
So the wee little Hobgoblin
He went to work with glee,
He let the cattle out the gate
And set the piglets free.
He spilled some milk in the kitchen,
And caused the soup to burn.
He pinched the baby and seared the cat
And had the mostest fun.
And when his spree was over
He said, “That’s a job well done!”
-Mark Shapiro


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Bauchan, Bogan, or Bocan – An English spirit who is often mischievous, sometimes dangerous, and sometimes helpful.

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Hob-Thrush, Hobthrust, Hobthrush – This being of the English North Country is similar to the Hob, but not a domestic spirit. They are mostly mischievous, but can be malevolent if offended, and inhabit ancient burial mounds, caves, crags, and isolated woodlands.

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Goblin (aka Gobblin, Gobelin, Gobeline, Gobling, Goblyn) – In European folklore, these are grotesque, diminutive, generally malicious earth sprites, about two inches in height with gray hair and beards. They like to inhabit human’s homes and play poltergeist-type tricks on the residents, with the exception of well-behaved children, whom they reward with small gifts. Should one take up residence in your home, and become a nuisance, cast flax seed all over your kitchen floor, and when he comes to do mischief in the night, he’ll be obliged to pick up all the seed, but there will be so much that he won’t be able to finish before dawn. After having to do this tedious task a few times, eh will give it up and leave.

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Houri – In the Muslim tradition of Persia these are beautiful, pure and shapely female spirits who live in Paradise. Also known as Hur and Huri (Huran is plural) they dance and play music while they await the arrival of the faithful who they will pleasure, as promised, in the afterlife.

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Hyldermodes, or Hylde-Maer – The one-of-a-kind guardian spirit of the sacred Elder tree in German and Danish folklore. One must show her respect and ask her permission before taking any fruit or wood from the tree. This Goddess appears in the form of a kindly old lady dressed in a flowing green gown and will lend her powers to tree magick, and fertility, prosperity, and divinatory spells, as well as magick designed to enhance ones psychic abilities.

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Ieles – These are giant cats who walk on two legs and prey on humans. They lie in wait near crossroads and dance and sing to lure humans into their blood-sucking embrace. They can’t go into the center of the crossroads; the equilateral cross protects humans by permanently neutralizing the Ieles’ powers.

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Illes – These Icelandic trolls live underground and can only come out at night, sunlight turns them to stone. They are naked with dark hair and skin, and are fond of playing pranks on humans, often with malicious intent. They lure humans to them by shape shifting into attractive men and women and by playing enchanting music on stringed instruments. Once entranced, they lead humans into their underground world, suffocate them to death, infect them with diseases, or leave them to pine away for their beautiful forms. They also love to dance under the full moon for hours on end.

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Kollimalaikanniyarka – These are the nymphs who educated the son of Siva and Parvati, Kattavarayan, in the Tamil mythology of India. Their name means Seven Maidens from the Kolli mountain and legend says they were transformed into the Kolli Mountain Peaks.

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Kobolds (aka Kobalds, Polterspites, Kobauld, Cobald, Kobolde, Kobolt, Cobolt, Hutchins, Heinzelmannchens) – There are tow types of these spirits in Teutonic mythology. The first are the beings who inhabit mines, like the Welsh Cobynau, and are highly skilled miners and metal smiths, also known as Cobolts. The other type are the German household spirits, similar to the English brownies, also known as Kobald, Kobelts, and Kobels, who resemble gnomes with their wizened faces, style of dress, and pointed hats. They live near the hearths of homes, barns, and stables, and perform unfinished chores during the night. They are kept happy by being given a portion of the family supper, and will maliciously punish those who ignore them, before leaving their chose abode. Some individual Kobolds are Chimmeken, Heinze, Hinzelmann, Hodekin, King Goldmar, and Walther.

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King Goldmar/Goldemar – He is the king of the malicious Black Dwarves who, in the fifteenth century, haunted the house of Neveling von Hardenburg. He remains invisible and, like Hinzelmann, demands a seat at the tabole, a room of his own, and room in the stable for his invisible horse. In exchange for this he would sing and play the harp and expose dishonest slaves and hypocritical clergymen, and his touch was said to feel like that of a frog’s paws.

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Hinzelmann – This German spirit inhabited Hudemuhlen Castle near Aller, and, although usually invisible, became a companion to the family and familiar with the servants. His wife’s name is Hille Bingels, and he is sometimes called Luring. When playing with the family’s children, he would sometimes manifest in the form of a curly-haired little boy, and was so fond of the lord’s two daughters that he frightened off any would-be suitors, until the girls remained spinsters. In 1588 Hinzelmann gave the lord of the castle three gifts, a woven silk cross, a straw hat, and a pearl-embroidered glove, telling him that they, together, would always bring him luck, before taking his leave and never being seen again.

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Korreds (Korrs, Kores, Pyrenees) – These Breton creatures are the male guardian spirits of sacred stone altars and standing stones who will instruct those on sincere spiritual quests on how to use those sources of power, and may be useful in spells cast for protection. They are described as being frightfully hideous with huge faces, long pointy noses, wildly spiked heads of hair, the hairy bodies of monkeys, skinny bird-like arms, long spindly legs, and cloven feet. They use their looks and loud hooting laughter to scare off those who attempt to use the power of the stones for personal ego boosting empowerment, or for malicious purposes. They are one of the few species of fae who are unaffected by metal’s grounding power, a source of food that increases their strength. Approach them with reverence, an open mind and sincere heart, making yourself known as a friend, and they will gladly welcome your presence.

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Leprecauns/Leprechauns {aka Luchorpen (Little Body), Lubrican, Lubberkin and Lupracan, in literature; Luchraman and The Loghery Man, in Ulster; Lurigadaune, in Tipperary; Luprechan, in Leinster; Luchragan, Lurgadan, and Cluracan, in Munster; Luracan, in south Leinster and Connacht; and Loimreachan, in East Leinster; Sheedim or Shedim, in Israel; The Gentry) – The earliest descriptions of this being are as the water sprites, luchiirp, or luchorpan, in the eighth century text Echtra Fergusa maic Leti (the Adventure of Fergus son of Lete). In the story, Fergus is sleeping on the beach in his chariot when the sprites lift him up, separating him from his sword, and carry him out over the sea. When Fergus grabs three of them, they promise to teach him how to swim, if he’ll let them go. This image, combined with other North Leinster spellings, suggests that the Lepracaun was an aquatic, or at least amphibious creature. But, many similar terms from various parts of Ireland suggest other associations. The Lepracaun’s current image comes from the popular works of T. Crofton Croker, especially Fairy Legends and Traditions of the South of Ireland (1825), and presticious literary adaptations, such as Lady Wilde’s Ancient Legends of Ireland (1887), James Stephens’ Crock of Gold (1912), the American musical Finian’s Rainbow (1947), and the poem by William Allingham, The Lepracaun (c. 1870).

In their present form, Lepracauns are solitary male faeries who love to play pranks on humans, but can also be helpful to those who respectfully approach them. They are always dressed in expensive green clothing and a green triangular hat or a red jacket with silver buttons, brown pants, silver-buckled black shoes, and a high crowned hat; however, he is usually wearing a leather apron and busily mending a faery’s shoe with his little hammer.

When not working, these fellows love to play music, dance, go fox hunting, and get drunk on Irish whisky. If one should happen upon an open burgh during one of their parties, and be invited to join, go ahead on in, just remember not to eat, drink, or dance with them.

Lepracauns are also said to guard crocks of gold, which is actually a symbol of spiritual attainment associated with the Crone Goddess, a cauldron of wisdom. If one can gain control over one of these tricky beings, he will lead one to the cauldron and grant one three wishes. There are several ways to control a Lepracaun: 1. Begin playing an Irish folk tune that will make him dance and unable to stop until you quit playing, eventually he will leaad you to the treasure to get you to let him rest; 2. Catch his eyes and stare at him without ever blinking, but don’t ever grab him, or he will become invisible, even if you manage to catch one, they still have ways of tricking you out of the cauldron and the three wishes. Lepracauns are very quick-witted and wily when they’re sober, and if he can get you to make a fourth wish before sunset you will forfeit everything, as it states in a poem by Mark Shapiro entitled The Three Wishes.

Lepracauns will help guide you to the crock of gold and may also help with prosperity spells and the care and protection of fine horses.

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Shedim, Sheedim, Sedim – The name given to Lepracauns when they were demonized by Hebrews and Christians in the scriptures of Deuteronomy and Psalms. They are considered to be dangerous to humans and often associated with magick invocations.

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Masseriol (Baraboas in Venice) – These Italian dwarfs are plump, elderly little men with beards and moustaches who dress in fine red clothing and pointed caps. They are equally comfortable with helping in the barn and stable as performing tasks around the house, so long as they don’t have to get dirty. Each fancies himself a lady’s man, and when not working, and be found flirting with the women of the household, attempting to woo them to his mountain lair to dance for him. He never hurts any of the girls, but the experience can be somewhat strange.

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Menehunas – These Polynesian Elves are residents in the tropical forests of the South Pacific. They have been said to help lost travelers get out of the jungles, even providing them with food and water along the way, but they can be mischievous as well. They are also said, like Lepracauns, to guard a crock of gold and to grant wishes to one who catches them. I f you should happen upon a Menehuna, for they can’t be summoned, you might try asking him to help you in your spiritual quest or to tell you things you need to know about yourself. You can try calling to them if you are lost in the jungle, and they may be persuaded to lend you their great magickal powers.

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The Moirae/Moerae (Furies, Norns, Gorgons, Erzulie, Zoryas, The Fates) – In Greek mythology, and in modern Greece, these are the birth spirits who appear in the rooms of three day old infants to determine the child’s destiny. The parents of these children leave offerings for the spirits on that night beside their child’s cradle to ensure the Moirae’s blessing.

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The Fates – These spirits of Roman mythology are also known as Cataclothes (the Spinners), Parcae, and Moirae. Their individual names are Cloth (Kloto), Lachesis, and Atropos. Clothos has a spinning wheel that she uses to spin the thread of mortal life, Lachesis measures the threads, and Atropos cuts them. They are usually depicted as either three old women, or as a young maiden, a middle-aged woman, and an elderly woman.

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The Parcae – Another group of Fates whose names are Nona, Decuma, and Morta, whose duties are the same as those of Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos, respectively.

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The Furies – These avenging spirits of Rome, whose name means The Angry Ones, are also known as Dirae and, in Greece, as Erinyes, Eumenides, or Semnai. These sisters, Alecto, Tisiphone, and Magaera, are said to have either been the daughters of the gods of Earth, or the Night, or to have grown from Uranus’ blood drops at the time of his castration. They are described as being human-shaped hags with snakes for hair and either the wings of a bat or the head of a dog. They torture humans guilty of unpunished crimes after they are dead; a fate so feared that they are only referred to by the euphemisms of Eumenides (Good-Tempered Ones, or The Kindly Ones) and Semnai (The Venerable Ones).

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Erinyes – In this form Alecto, Magaera, and Tisiphone are said to be black with eyes that ooze pus, snakes entwined in their hands and hair, and wearing soiled robes. They punish those guilty of blood crimes against their human family or those who oppressed others.

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Alecto, whose name means The Unceasing, is the spirit of war, pestilence, and ultimate revenge, who exacts revenge upon those who have killed one or both of their parents, and were never punished by human laws.


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Magaera, whose name means Envious Fury, is the spirit of ultimate revenge who assists her sisters Alecto and Tisiphone.


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Tisiphone’s name means Retaliation, and she is the spirit of ultimate revenge who waits by the gates of hell, in a bloodied robe, to punish those who got away with committing hideous crimes during their lifetime.

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Gorgons – These hideous creatures of Greek mythology have wings and a flat round face with protruding teeth and live snakes for hair. Anyone who looks at a gorgon is instantly turned to stone. These offspring of Phorcys the sea god’s incestuous relationship with his sister Ceto, are Stheno, Euryale, and Medusa. Of these three only Stheno and Euryale are immortal, Medusa was killed by Perseus, who used her head as a weapon against his enemies and then gave it to Athene to use in her shield.

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Euryal - Not much is known about her except that she's immortal.

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Stheno - Known as "The Forceful One," she is immortal and unkillable.

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Medusa - The infamous ugly Gorgon whose face turned people to stone. She began life as an incredibly beautiful human female and was turned into a Gornon by a jealous Athena. It is because of this that Perseus was able to kill her. Pegasus, the winged horse, was born of her blood.

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Norns – These are the Moirae of Norse mythology, the daughters of the dwarf Davalin, they’re also known as Alrauns, Dises, Idises, Nornir, and Valkyrie. They are Udur, who represents the past; Verdandi, and Skuld. They live at the base of the sacred ash tree, Yggdrasil. They usually appear, wearing long gray dresses and veils of gray gossamer over their heads after the birth of a child, to determine its fate.

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Udur – This spirit of the past is also known as Urd, Urdur, Urdhr, Urth, Wurd, and wyrd. It is her Anglo-Saxon name Wyrd that gave rise to the Wyrdes or Wierd Sisters, an English name for witches. Because she is constantly looking back, she is associated with Hel, the goddess of death and the underworld.

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Verdandi - Her name means "in the making" or "that which is happening/beginning." She handles problems in the present.

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Skuld - The norn who controls mankinds future destiny.

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Dis (a.k.a. Dises and Idises) – These spirit maidens of Teutonic mythology have power over fate and war. They usually appear in human form and wrapped in dark veils as a warning of impending doom. These are spirits are intimately linked with a family and with the land. The land is an intimate part of the family and its identity, so it is natural that family spirits would also oversee the family land. The Disir are women who come to the aid of their family during times of great trouble or change. They are attached to a family's bloodline, most closely to the clan's chief. These beings Disir are honored with blots on Winter Nights and they possess great power that they use to aid their family. They are believed to be either a family's ancestor or the collective spirits of all of their ancestors. Freya is known as the great Dis and there may be a connection here to her being a seidhrwoman (seer).

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Mother Holle – A middle-aged female goddess of Germany with long black hair who wears a robe of dark green. She is neither good nor bad, but a fair dispenser of justice to mortals. She spends her days at her spinning wheel and can be petitioned for spiritual guidance and knowledge of the future. She rewards those who diligently pursue spiritual enlightenment, especially young women and those who work hard while in her service. She resides in a beautiful green meadow at the bottom of a wishing well and opens her home to all who do her bidding and follow her advice, which often leads to the rebirthing of one’s soul.

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Nibelungen/Nibelung (Raksha) – These dwarves of Germany, Norway, and Denmark, live in a hidden crystal palace beneath the earth’s surface, and can be seen when they emerge in forests and other woodlands. They possess a horde of gold, symbolic of spiritual knowledge, that is guarded by Fafnir, the dragon, while they are top-side. They are very moody and mischievous beings, and delight in foiling those who try to steal their treasure; however, they may help you in fertility spells and as spiritual guides, if you find them in Faeryland and tell them you know the true nature of their gold.

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The Oak King – This is the pagan King of the Waxing Year who wears a small breechcloth, a crown made from acorns and oak leaves, and carries an oak staff in his right hand. He reigns from Yule until Midsummer, assuming the rulership from the Holly King, the two being aspects of one, and he is symbolized by the robin, a bird of spring, and is sometimes called Robin Redman. Also see Erlkonig of the Faeries of the Air.

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Oread – The Greek and Roman nymphs of mountains and caves who attended to the goddess of the hunt, Diana.

They are also described by Percy Byshe Shelley in The Witch of Atlas.

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The Paian – This is the dwarf faery congress of Scandinavian who meets during the Sabbats to work, play, and discuss business matters, similar to the Seelie Court of Scotland.

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Painajainen (aka Linchettos, in Italy) – These small faeries are white horses who live in the Alps. Their chief delight is tormenting children with nightmares, and they have even been known to hurt, but never steal or kill them. They can live for as long as 4,000 years and placing some broom or iron under a child’s pillow will keep them away.

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Pamarindo – This male dwarf of northern Italy is a tiny, fat, nasty creature who kills animals by forcing them to run off of the edges of cliffs and impale themselves on fallen tree branches. He dresses in a fur hat and red clothes that are stained with animal fat, is very lazy, and isn’t liked by other faeries. He is incredibly rude, having abominable table manners and knocking down travelers on lonely roads, and doesn’t like to socialize with others, thank goodness.

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Penates – These household guardian spirits of Rome are also known as Lares and they behave much like a brownie, adopting a family and doing work for them at night. They inhabit the home’s hearth, like fresh bread and wine, and help to increase their chosen family’s wealth and ensure their health. Penates are also associated with the domestic goddess Vesta, and are provided with a burning fire, salt, and the first portion of every meal in appreciation for their ensuring the household’s food supply and good harvests.

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Lar/Lares – These guardian spirits are said to be the children of Lara the Naiad, and are divided into several categories, according to their location and activities. The Lar Familiaris is often considered to be the elevated soul of an ancestor of the family whose household they protect. They are given a special place beside the hearth and a portion of the family meal each evening. The Lar Praestites is the acknowledged guardians of cities; the Lar Compitales guards the city’s subdivisions and crossroads; the Lar Rurales is the guardian of the countryside; the Lar Viales guards roadways and travelers; and the Lar Marini is the guardian spirit of seas and fishermen. They are happy young lads and maidens who dance and bring good fortune.

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Portunes – Very tiny wizened male faeries, less than an inch tall, who inhabit farms to help with the chores, and will grant one wish to anyone who captures them. These little “Wish Makers” live on a diet of roasted frogs and have a somewhat mischievous nature, but may be helpful guides in one’s spiritual quest. They are willing to help with any task, no matter how difficult, being very good and kindly spirits. Their only known trick is that of taking the bridle of a night traveler’s horse and leading them into a pond or lake and laughing at the startled human before vanishing.

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Robin Goodflelow – This English fella is known in many lands, such as Greece, Celtic areas, and maybe even Germany, and by other names, including Puck, Pan, and Jack Robinson. He is the half-faery son of Oberon and a country wench, whose mother was kept well supplied by his faery friends with fine, expensive clothing, food and wine. He has always had the precocious and mischievous faery nature, but he didn’t obtain his special powers until the age of six, when he ran away from home. While he was out wandering he had a vision of faeries, and one morning he woke to find a golden scroll granting him the power of shape shifting and of obtaining whatever he wanted lying beside him. These powers were given to him to be used against the ill disposed and for helping honest people, and, once he had proven worthy, he would then be shown Faeryland. He immediately tried out his new powers and discovered that he really did have them, spurring him into action as a career hobgoblin, who truly is kind and helpful to those in need, and plays pranks on those who are dishonest and cruel.

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Puck – The best description of this being, also known as Pucke, Poake, Pouke, Puckle, and Pug, is given in this speech to Titania in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream:

“I am that merry wanderer of the night,
I jest to Oberon, and make him smile,
When I a fat and bean-fed horse beguile,
Neighing in likeness of a filly foal:
And sometime lurk I in a gossip’s bowl,
In very likeness of a toasted crab;
And, when she drinks, against her lips I bob,
And on her wither’d dew lap pour the ale.
The wisest aunt, telling the saddest tale,
Sometime for three-foot stool mistaketh me;
Then I slip from her bum, down topples she,
And tailor cries, and falls into a cough;
And then the whole quire hold their hips, and loffe;
And waxen in their mirth, and neeze, and swear
A merrier hour was never wasted there.

Human follies are his constant source of entertainment, but he has his softer moments, his indignation is always raised against scornful lovers and he feels real compassion for their victims. He is a shape shifter and performs brownie-like tasks for humans. The only difference between Shakespeare’s Puck and those of tradition is that he’s a member of the faery court and, therefore, can’t be called a solitary faery.

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Salmacis (a.k.a. Salmachis and Salmakis) - the guardian nymph of the spring that bears her name near Halicarnassus in Asia Minor. She ws in love with Hermaphroditus and the gods granted her request tobe united with him by placing both of them into one body. This is where the word Hermaphrodite, dual sexuality, go its meaning and it is also the source of the legend that drinking or bathing in the spring's waters will make one effeminate.

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Sevan – A very mischievous faery of Switzerland, similar to Trows, who like to hide people’s things in odd places.

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Skogrsa/Skogs Fru – A very dangerous shape shifting wood spirit of Sweden. She can manifest in the form of an owl in the trees, a violent whirlwind, or as a beautiful human woman, and in their normal form they are short and hairy and have very large noses. If you should encounter one, be careful not to let her lure you into the forest of trick you into playing their game of “I know something you don’t know.”

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Sleigh Beggey/Veggey (aka Squinters) – These sky faeries from the Isle of Man, sometimes called Ny Mooinjer Veggey (Little Kindred), are naked and stocky little dudes who hate the taste of salt and can’t stand ashes or artificial light. They are known for being quick to anger, abducting humans, and for making beautiful music.

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Sylvans – Beautiful Greek faeries who lure humans into the woods and kill them, especially at night.

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Thussers (aka Vardogls, in Iceland) – A community of small faeries in Norway, complete with males, females, and children, who live in mounds near river narrow. They love to dance and play the fiddle during moonlight celebrations, and are excellent metalsmiths. These shy little beings adore the Moon Goddess in all her phases and, although they tend to avoid human contact, may be willing to join in Esbat rituals – you’ll feel their power if they decide to attend.

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Tighe Faeries – These Manx beings are very similar to brownies, but they only perform helpful tasks of their own volition, and will refuse if asked for assistance. They are emotionally sensitive, love fires, hate loud noises and cats, and detest all displays of gratitude other than offerings of food.

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Tomtra, Tomtar, tomte, Tomte Gubbe – These beings are the Little People of Finland and Sweden who were displaced by the Vikings. They are all male and dress in brown clothing and green caps. The Tomtra, like the Tuatha de Danann, live in ancient forts, sacred stone altars, and mounds of earth. They are highly skilled in magick, making tools, and many other crafts, and used these skills to maliciously harass the humans who invaded their land. People eventually learned to appease these spirits with small gifts and offerings of cream and milk throughout the year, in exchange for which they took to helping people maintain their farms and homes. Eventually the Tomtra began adopting homes and families, becoming their guardians and bringers of good fortune and prosperity. They are very small and, therefore, don’t work as quickly as other types of household spirits, and they take Thursdays as a holy day of rest. They love to tend to horses, and hate cheats and misers, who he punishes by stealing their harvested grains and milk. They are expert fiddlers who are safe and fun to dance with, and will happily lend their powers and energy to Goddess celebrations and spells for home protection and for physical energy and endurance. On Yule mornings, they expect a holiday gift of porridge, bread, and tobacco, to give on these or anything better during the year is an offense that will send the Tomtra away.

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Trolls (aka Trolds, in Sweden; Trows, in the United Kingdom; Hill Men, Berg People or Knurre Murre, in Denmark; Henkies, in Scotland; and Hogboon, in the Orkney Islands) – The Trolls of Germany and Scandinavia are sometimes called Trolds, or Trollds, and are adept shape shifters who usually take on a large, hairy shape, or that of a gnome or dwarf. Although their names and descriptions widely vary by region, they are almost always considered to be malicious beings who dislike humans. In fact, they tend to think humans are ugly and smelly and are very afraid of us and our power, they also hate animals and other faeries. In Denmark, they are little old men with long white beards who wear red caps and leather aprons. In Ebletoft, they’re hump-backed, have large hooked noses, and wear gray jackets and red caps. But, in Gudmanstrup, they’re tall men dressed in long black garments and, in Iceland they are one-eyed giants. Fortunately for us, they are rather dim-witted and are easily outsmarted when trying to harm or capture humans, and sunlight causes them to explode or turn to stone.

The homes of trolls are said to be wondrous palaces so filled with treasures that they glow in the night. They hate loud noises, church bells will send them running away, and a branch of mistletoe can be used as a talisman to protect one from them. They are excellent metalworkers and expert healers with herbs and magick, skills they will use to benefit humans that they befriend. They have been known to be benevolent towards humans and for endowing families with riches and good fortune. When they are malicious they are destructive and bring bad luck, and will also steal women, children, and property.

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Berg People – This species of Swedish troll is also known as Bergfolk, Bjerg-Trolde, or Skovtrolde (the wood troll), and they resemble dwarves, although they often assume the shape of toads. The women are said to be beautiful and have long red hair. One well-known tale tells of a midwife who, wile on her way home from delivering a human baby, sees a fat toad with white stripes in the road, and tells it she will gladly deliver it too. Two weeks later a little man with a long white beard draws a cart up to her door and asks her to attend to his wife as she’d promised. The midwife agrees to do it, but can’t help comment about their poor abode. The little new mother tells the midwife to anoint her eyes with the liquid in a nearby pot, whereupon the midwife sees the true beauty and wealth around her, and she is given a large gift of gold for her service. The mother then tells the woman to jump from the cart when she reaches boggy ground, otherwise the little man will kill her instead of taking her home. In fear she does as she is told and arrives home safely with her reward. Sometime later, while she is out shopping, she recognizes and greets the little man who immediately pokes out her eyes.

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Fodden Skemaend – These trolls of the Faroe Islands are also known as the Hollow men, or the Underground People, and are infamous for abducting humans and keeping them as captives for many years.

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Hogboon or Hogboy – These spirits of the Orkney Islands inhabit ancient mounds of earth and old farmlands. They are described as being tiny gray men who, although they never go into human dwellings, repair household tools left for them, and protect the farmer’s animals from Trows. To keep them happy, offerings of milk and ale are left outside their abodes. Attempting to dig up their homes, or neglecting to appease them, will cause them to become destructive and inflict all sorts of misfortune on the family.

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Henkies – This group of trolls, in the Shetland and Orkney Islands of Scotland, have a pronounced limp, or henk, when they dance, which is where their name comes from.

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Knurre Murre – This is the name of an old and bad-tempered troll in Denmark whose name means Rumble Grumble.


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Sjotroll – this is the name of a malignant troll in Finland who is forced, by way of runic stones placed at both ends, to live in a lake in Kakar. During a storm and times of fog the magick of the stones is obscured and he will emerge from the lake to drown anyone who is near.

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Y Tylwyth Teg – The Fair Family of Wales also known as Bendith Y Mamau (the Mother’s Blessing), a euphemism used to avert kidnappings and other mischief. Their euphemistic name in Dyfed (Pembrokeshire) is Dynon Bach Teg, which means Little Fair Folk and their name is sometimes spelled Twlwwth Teg. They are also known as Gwarwyn a Throt (the white napped one with the trot), Jili Ffrwtan (a name for those Y Tylwyth Teg females who are proud and amorous), Sili Ffrt, Sili-go-Dust, and Trwtyn Tratyn. The Welsh name for Faeryland is Gwlad y Tylwyth Teg, and their king is Gwyn ap Nudd, the British God of the Dead.

These folks vary in description from being only about a foot tall to being taller than a man, but they are all very beautiful, with fair skin and blonde hair. They dress in long silken garments of red, blue, white, yellow, and, usually, green. They love and covet fair-haired humans and will only reveal themselves to them, sometimes abducting golden-haired children. They live in clans in lakes and, occasionally, underground, and are usually kind to humans, but can also be mischievous. Their children reach maturity at the age of 100, which is when they leave their families to live with other young faeries, until they find a mate.

The Y Tylwyth Teg love kind and generous people, gardening, music, and dancing, but joining them in their parties, during the morning mists or moonlit nights, will trap one in Faeryland. The only danger of getting trapped in their faery rings lies in the miraculous passage of time in the land of the Fae, and carrying a piece of iron or rowan branch will allow one to escape – the iron will make them disappear. The Y Tylwyth Teg are said to have paradisiacal gardens and to raise magickal cattle, the most famous of which is the speckled cow of Hiraethog. They will reward those who are generous to them with good fortune. This usually involves giving them food and fresh water and loaning them baking implements and milk pails to use for making faery cakes. If given a faery cake, the human must eat it before sunrise, or it will become a toadstool. The Y Tylwyth Teg maidens will often consent to marry human males and bear them children, but as with most faery wives, they will vanish if some taboo or promise is broken. In short, they have all the characteristics of the ordinary faery folk.

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Gwyn ap Nudd, Knudd, Naud – The God of battles and the Otherworld, Annwfn, and the king of the Y Tylwyth Teg, charged with controlling imprisoned devils and stopping them from destroying mankind. His name, Gwyn, means white, fair, and holy, but he bears a black face when leading the pack of faery dogs known as cw^n annwfn, the hounds of hell, in the Wild Hunt.

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Plant Annwn – This is the name of the Welsh faeries who inhabit the Otherworld, a realm accessed through the depths of the lakes of Wales. Their beautiful maidens, the Gwragen Annwn, their white or speckled cattle, the Gwartheg Y Llyn, and their swift white hounds, the Cw^n Annwn, are the best known of their ilk. Their king is Arawn.

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Cw^n Annwn (a.k.a. Cw^n Mamau, "hounds of the Mothers") - These white, red-eared spectral hell hounds are the companions of Arawn in Annwn, the land of the dead. They accompay him during the Wild Hunt on St. John's Eve, St. Martin's Eve, the eve of St. Michael the Archangel, All Saints Eve, Christmas Eve, New Year's Eve, the eve of St. Agnes, the eve of St. David, and Good Friday's Eve - or just during autumn and winter. In Wales they are associated with migrating geese because their honking in the night resembles the sound of barking dogs. The hunts are presided over by either Arawn or Gwyn ap Knudd - it is said that Arawn only hunts from Christmas to twelfth night (January 5th, the Christian eve of the Epiphany).

Arawn and the hounds are sometimes accompanied by a fearsome hag called Mallt-y-Nos (Matilda of the Night).

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Mallt-y-Nos - The Welsh crone who accompanies Arawn during the Wild Hunt, chasing sorrowful, lost souls in his direction. She is also said to drive the hounds by shrieking and wailing, sounds that some claim are evil and mailicious in nature, although they aren't. Some say that she was once a beautiful but impudent noblewoman who so loved to hunt that one day she said, "If there is no hunting in heaven, I would rather not go!" They say that she now regrets having said that and now cries out in misery rather than joy as she eternally hunts in the night sky.

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Gwragen Annwn (aka Gwragedd Annwn) – These Lake Maidens are gentle, beautiful beings with long golden hair who can, sometimes, be heard flying with the Cw^n Annwn through the skies in Midsummer, searching for the souls of unrepentant sinners.

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Gwartheg Y Llyn – These faery cattle of Wales are usually white, but sometimes speckled, and are similar to the Crodh Mara of Scotland. They are often given as part of a Gwragedd Annwn’s dowry, but sometimes a water-bull will visit an earthly heard, with very fortunate results for the farmer. There is one tale of a faery cow attaching herself to an earthly bull, and the farmer who succeeded in catching her was very prosperous. After a time, however, he began to think the cow would no longer produce superior calves, butter, milk, and cheese, and so fattened her to be slaughtered. But, when the time came for the butcher to chop off the cow’s head his arm was paralyzed and he dropped his knife. A piercing scream rang out, and the crown of onlookers saw a tall maiden dressed in green standing on the crag above Llyn Barfog. While standing there, she chanted out in a powerful voice:

“Come thou, Einion’s Yellow One,
Stray-horns, the Particoloured Lake Cow,
And the hornless Dodin;
Arise, come home.”

As she sang, the cow broke free, and she and all of her offspring raced up the side of the mountain to the faery lady. The farmer gave chase, to no avail, only to see her lead them to safety down into the dark waters of the lake. The farmer then became as poor as he had been rich.

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Arawn – The King of Annwn, the Welsh Otherworld, who gave his friend, Pwyll, the Prince of Dyfed, the gift of pigs that were to become an important part of Welsh legend.

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Urisks/Uruisg – These beings, whose name means Water Man, are a group of rustic brownie-like faeries in Scotland. They are extremely ugly half-human half-goats with wrinkled skin, random patches of hair, emaciated bodies, huge, deformed heads, and duck feathers on their backs and necks. Although their appearance is dreadful enough to literally scare people to death, they are very kind creatures and love human companionship. They are very lucky to have around the house, herd cattle, perform other farmwork, and love to eat dairy products. Sometimes, in their loneliness, they would join terrifies travelers, ambling along beside them in the night. They live in secluded woodlands near lakes and are said to have divinatory powers.

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Vasily – Russian dwarf faeries who love, protect, and tend to horses. They are both male and female, live in barns, and sleep in hay. They avoid human contact, but are the greatest horse lovers in any dimension, taking special care of those that are elderly or sick.

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Vilas/Veelas (aka Vily, Vala, Vile, Volva, Vlishkis, Willi, and Oosgood) – These are the guardian spirits of the lakes, woods, and streams of Eastern Europe, and are highly skilled in healing with the herbs of their domain. They are described as being very beautiful young maidens with long flowing hair, dressed in diaphanous white gowns. They love to make music and dance in forest glades by moonlight, and they speak every known animal language, as well. Vilas are normally kind to humans, but any mortal who sees them dancing, or breaks their circle, is condemned to dance with them to death; males who see them dancing become so enchanted that they yearn for the Veela and pine away to death. They live in communities and will marry and have children with mortals. If you perform an act of kindness toward them, or the animals they care for, they will become your life long friends and assist you in any magickal workings, they may even lead you to healing herbs and instruct you in their uses.

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Vily – This is the Slavonic spirit of wind and storms who inhabit the local mountain caves, and are appeased with offerings of flowers. They are believed to be the lost souls of virgins who, in their transformed state, are intent on luring men to their deaths. They may appear in the form of a swan or a horse and, although generally harmless, may shoot their magick arrows at people to make them insane.

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Oosgood – The female birth spirit of Serbia who, while only visible to the mother, visits seven-day-old infants to determine their destinies.

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Wag-by-the-Way/Wag-at-the-Wa’ – “His general appearance was that of a grisly old man, with short, crooked legs, while a long tail assisted him in keeping his seat on the crook. Sometimes he appeared in a gray mantle, with the remains of an old ‘pirnicap’ (night-cap) on his head, drawn down over that side of the face that was troubled with toothache, a constant grievance of his; but he commonly wore a red coat and blue breeches, both garment s being made of ‘familie woo’.” – William Henderson in Folklore of the Northern Counties.

He’s a spirit of the Scottish Lowlands who adopts a home and performs unfinished chores during the night, like a brownie. His favorite place to “hang out” is on the cauldron hook in a fireplace, where he swings to and fro. He loves cheerful humans and the company of children, and homes that are neat and clean. He’s somewhat eccentric and will make angry coughing noises if anything stronger than home brewed ale is drunk in his presence, he’ll also torment people who are lazy and messy. His merry disposition is of great credit to him, since he suffered from a perpetual toothache, and, although he has no fear of iron, he can be frightened off by the sign of the cross. They are very protective of their adopted homes, especially against human intruders, and are also protective of travelers.

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Wichtlin – These malicious German pranksters are known as Vattaren in Switzerland and Wights in England. They have round, fat bodies and disproportionately long legs and arms, and can amuse themselves for eternity by playing annoying, sometimes hurtful pranks on humans.

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Wights – In ancient German, this word meant “being,” it now denotes an evil-natured, impish spirit.

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Wictlein – German mine spirits who appear as little men with long hair and beards who dress in brown hooded jackets, aprons, breeches, stockings, and shoes. They also have a tool belt and carry lanterns and picks. Wictleins are known to shower miners with stones to alert them to rich veins of oar, and invisibly make sounds of digging when disaster is coming.

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Wilde Fraun – These are the wood sprites of Germany and Scandinavia, similar to the Elles and Elle Maids of Sweden, whose name means “Wild Woman.” They grow to be no taller than three feet in height and have been seen in all stages of life, from children to elderly women. They are called “Wild” because they live among the roots of the old-growth forests, where they wear the plants and color of the seasons as clothing. Their queen is very powerful, perhaps a goddess in her own right. The Wilde Fraun might be willing to help you in magickal workings, especially those designed to help, protect, strengthen, and heal the environment.

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Yannig/Yannig-An-Od/Yan-An-Od – The faery king of Brittany who rises up out of the sea at night, disguised as a kindly old shepherd, and hoots like an owl. Humans should ignore this spectre’s call, even when he asks for pity, for on the third call he will appear behind them, consume them, and turn them into a whiff of air.

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The Yeti (aka Sasquatch, Bigfoot, Abominable Snowman, Snow Monster, Gorilla Man) – A huge, two-footed being covered with white or light brown fur, and a gorilla-like appearance, who inhabits the coldest regions of Asia and North America.

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Zips – Tiny, thin male faeries equipped with helmets and tiny spears who protect and care for deer, especially stags, in Mexico and Central America.

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Lisa's Planet Hafapea's Universe



To Purchase Fairy Garden: Fairies of the Four Seasons
For books by Laurie Cabot, click here.
To Purchase Edain McCoy's A Witch's Guide to Faery Folk
Buy Brian Froud's Faeries & Good Faeries, Bad Faeries Here
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